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  • November 2011
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Books on the Big Screen

I just finished reading Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro.  If you ever wander the shelves of the teen section, you may know that Never Let Me Go tells the story of three friends in near-future Britain who attend an exclusive boarding school for “special children.” There, the guardians  groom the students to accept their “destiny” as organ donors, created to die young so that others can live longer.

What you may not know is that Never Let Me Go was made into a movie in 2010 starring Keira Knightley, Carey Mulligan, and Andrew Garfield. The New York Times called it “one of the best dystopian science fiction films around, a potential classic of the genre. ” (Click HERE to read the article).

That got me thinking about other books that have or are going to be made into movies. Most recently, the Hunger Games (2012, the trailer was released earlier this week), Breaking Dawn Part I (today), Harry Potter 7 Part 2 (July 2011), and…I couldn’t think of any more.

Fortunately, there is a website that features movies (and tv shows/mini-series/etc…) that are based on books. I think we all knew that Breaking Dawn was opening in theaters this month, but I didn’t know that The Invention of Hugo Cabret by Brian Selznick is coming to a theater near you on November 23rd, that is until I read the “Books on Screen” from TeenReads.com.  There is a different feature each month. You should definitely check it out if you like your books on the big screen.  Just to give you a teaser of how great the website is, here is their bit about Hugo:

“And hitting the big screen on November 23rd (of this year, fortunately) is HUGO, based on Brian Selznick’s bestseller THE INVENTION OF HUGO CABRET. Hugo is a young orphan boy who is secretly living inside the walls of a busy Paris train station in the 1930s. In his time there, he has mastered the inner workings of the station’s clocks and has become their secret caretaker. But when he meets an eccentric new friend and discovers a mysterious mechanical man, Hugo must risk everything in a desperate mission to uncover the truth.”

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