• Recent Posts

  • CLP_Teens

    Error: Twitter did not respond. Please wait a few minutes and refresh this page.

  • Blog Categories

  • Archives

  • January 2014
    M T W T F S S
    « Dec   Feb »
     12345
    6789101112
    13141516171819
    20212223242526
    2728293031  

The Labs @ CLP: MLK Workshop

Aerial view of the March on Washington Photo credit: Getty Images

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.‘s speech, “I have a Dream,” is considered one of the most important cultural and historical moments of the 20th Century. Dr. King was just one of the speakers at The March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, the largest protest demonstration in U.S. history. Check out an original flyer for the event from the archives of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania!

On August 28, 1963, more than 250,000 people of all races marched peacefully from the Washington Monument to the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C. to lobby for the passage of civil rights laws. Just two months earlier during a live broadcast, President Kennedy unveiled plans to pursue a comprehensive civil rights bill in Congress. The ‘March on Washington’ was one of the first protests to have extensive television coverage, so in addition to the quarter of a million people in attendance, millions watched from home. It proved that protests do not need to be violent to be powerful. The March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom became the landmark event in the movement that led to the successful passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Dr. King thrilled the crowd with his “I Have A Dream” speech, but did you know that the his planned speech was originally called “Normalcy, Never Again?” The speech became known as “I Have a Dream,” but those words were never in the draft of original speech. They were ad-libbed into his speech after Mahalia Jackson, one the music performers urged him, “Tell them about the dream, Martin.” She had heard him talk about his dream a few months earlier at a huge rally in Detroit. Even though Dr. King was warned to stay away from talking about his dream by his adviser, due to it being “trite” and “cliche,” King was encouraged by Jackson to ignore the advice. Would the speech have had the same reach, political impact and resonance 50 years later without it? Score one for the dreamers.

Photo credit: Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library

Photo credit: Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library

The Labs invites teens of all skill levels to take part in workshops. Mentors lead project-based workshops according to the weekly theme, providing software and equipment tutorials. Workshops are informal, fun, and drop-in friendly. The Labs @ CLP is available to our teen patrons in grades 6-12.

This week all Labs locations will be celebrating Martin Luther King, Jr. and the March on Washington by recreating the event using Google Street View and the graphics editing program Adobe Photoshop.  Create 360 degree panoramic views of the march, while expanding your knowledge of Photoshop and its collection of blending tools. You’ll even be able to insert YOUR image into the historic photographs and take home a printed artifact of the finished product. This is a photography and design workshop that is not to be missed!

Tuesday, January 14th | 4:00 – 7:00 PM
CLP – Main
4400 Forbes Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15213
412-622-3121
thelabs@carnegielibrary.org

Wednesday, January 15th | 4:00 – 7:00 PM
CLP – East Liberty
130 S. Whitfield Street
Pittsburgh, PA 15206
412.363.8232
eastliberty@carnegielibrary.org

Thursday, January 16th | 4:00 – 7:00 PM
CLP – Allegheny
1230 Federal Street
Pittsburgh, PA 15212
412.237.1890
allegheny@carnegielibrary.org

An example of what you can do at The Labs this week!

Created by Chris from CLP – LABS

Want more? Check out these materials about the Civil Rights movement in America.

lauren @ CLP – Woods Run

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: